Russian version

Home page

Search:

For contact - E-mail

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
To add or edit advertisment:     e-mail:     password:
Scientific News
Scientific News Technologies of the savings of resources

  FIRST FUEL-CELL CARS IN CANADA HIT B.C. STREETS
Five fuel-cell cars powered by hydrogen instead of gasoline were delivered by Dr. Gerhard Schmidt, Vice-President, Research and Advanced Engineering, Ford Motor Company, and Joe Hinrichs, President and CEO of Ford of Canada, to the Vancouver Fuel Cell Vehicle Program (VFCVP) today, moving Canada closer to a cleaner-energy future.

  COMPACT FUEL CELLS COULD OUST BATTERIES
HOT on the heels of a warning about the mounting energy demands of smart cellphones comes a ray of hope. Cellphone giant Nokia last week warned that battery technology is not keeping pace with advanced phone functions - but a trick that boosts the power of miniature hydrogen fuel cells by up to 50 per cent could help keep energy-hungry gadgets up and running.

  BROOKHAVEN LAB AND ARGONNE LAB SCIENTISTS. INVENT A PLASMA VALVE.
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use. The new device, called a plasma valve, was developed through research funded by DOEs Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Science.

  LEAF SECRET INSPIRES SELF-CLEANING PAINT
A self-cleaning paint inspired by lotus leaves is being developed by Australian researchers. A paint compound, which is currently being tested by its developers at the Centre for Advanced Materials Technology at the University of Sydney is designed to prevent dirt from sticking to its surface.

  WHITE HOUSE ANNOUNCES INTENT TO BUILD WORLD’S FIRST ZERO-EMISSIONS POWER PLANT. COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY SCIENTIST CHALLENGES ACADEMIA AND INDUSTRY T
A long-time advocate and designer of zero-emissions power plants, Dr. Klaus Lackner was thrilled with President Bush’s statement that the United States will sponsor a $1 billion, 10-year demonstration project to create the world’s first coal-based, zero-emissions electricity and hydrogen power plant, but Lackner calls for an even larger vision.

  NEW SOLAR THERMAL PROJECT - WHAT A GAS!
Australian scientists have combined solar energy and natural gas in a novel process capable of producing large-scale energy to power the country’s future industrial and domestic needs.

  NEW LIGHT-WEIGHT ENGINE BLOCK
Australian researchers have developed a new magnesium alloy they say is a "frontrunner" in the race to make a new generation light-weight engine block.

  CLEANING UP WATER WITH VIRUSES
Australian researchers have discovered naturally-occurring viruses play a key role in toxic blue-green algal blooms, raising the possibility of biological controls to keep water supplies clean.

  150-TON MAGNET PULLS WORLD TOWARD NEW ENERGY SOURCE
A 150-ton magnet developed in part by MIT engineers is pulling the world closer to nuclear fusion as a potential source of energy.

  BIODEGRADABLE REINFORCED PLASTICS COULD REPLACE LANDFILLS WITH COMPOST HEAPS, CORNELL FIBER SCIENTIST BELIEVES.
Instead of landfills clogged with computer and car parts, packaging and a myriad of other plastic parts, a Cornell University fiber scientist has a better idea. In coming years, he says, many of these discarded items will be composted.

  SCIENTISTS DEVELOP ATOMIC-SCALE MEMORY
In 1959, physics icon Richard Feynman, in a characteristic back-of-the-envelope calculation, predicted that all the words written in the history of the world could be contained in a cube of material one two-hundredths of an inch wide - provided those words were written with atoms.

  DISCOVERY COULD BRING WIDESPREAD USES FOR ’NANOCRYSTALS’
Researchers at Purdue University have made a surprising discovery that could open up numerous applications for metal "nanocrystals," or tiny crystals that are often harder, stronger and more wear resistant than the same materials in bulk form.

  SCIENTISTS USE ALFALFA PLANTS TO HARVEST NANOPARTICLES OF GOLD
Ordinary alfalfa plants are being used as miniature gold factories that one day could provide the nanotechnology industry with a continuous harvest of gold nanoparticles.

  HYBRID BUSES OPERATE WITH LOWER EMISSIONS, GREATER FUEL EFFICIENCY
A recently released study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) concludes that hybrid buses operate with lower emissions and greater fuel efficiency than conventional diesel buses.

  BRING ON THE LIGHT: ENERGY-SAVING FLUOROS
A new device from the United States could make fluorescent lighting even more efficient than it already is. Standard fluorescent lights save four times more energy than an ordinary light bulb, but they’re still wasteful, and more efficient versions are expensive.

  UNUSUAL CERAMICS COULD EXPAND POSSIBILITIES FOR SUPERCONDUCTORS
Ceramic materials with "split personalities" could lead to new high-temperature superconductors, according to physicists at Ohio State University and their colleagues.

  THE ROMANS PREFERRED SMALL-SCALE SOLUTIONS TO AQUEDUCTS AND SEWERS
Contrary to common opinion, the Romans had several systems for the supply and drainage of water. The Romans preferred small-scale provisions such as cesspits, wells and rainwater tanks. The residents only constructed a water supply network or a sewerage system if these were not effective.

  AUSSIE BIO-CEMENT TO SAVE DUTCH DYKES
An Australian researcher is using bacteria to develop a biological cement that may help patch up failing Dutch dykes, essential in protecting the land from rising sea levels. Vicky Whiffin of Murdoch University has been experimenting with bacteria which convert sand into sandstone, as part of her PhD research.

  AMES LABORATORY RESEARCHERS DISCOVER SOLVENT-FREE ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. PROCESS USES MECHANICAL ENERGY TO CARRY OUT REACTIONS IN SOLID STATE.
When chemists want to combine two or more organic materials, ordinarily they use a solvent to carry out a reaction that results in the desired compound. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory have found a way to combine organic materials in solid state without the use of solvents. This revolutionary solvent-free process means that environmentally harmful solvents, such as benzene, dichloromethane and others, could be removed from many of the chemical processes used to produce millions of consumer and industrial products.

   BACTERIA POINT THE WAY TO GOLD DEPOSITS
Can bacteria help find gold? A pilot survey of 11 soil profiles across gold mining regions in the Peoples Republic of China indicates that elevated spore counts of Bacillus cereus, a common soil bacterium, were detected in areas adjacent to underlying gold deposits.

  DRIP FREE TEA NOW A REALITY
The age-old problem of dripping teapots has finally been solved by a young English inventor. Product design engineer Ms Damini Kumar, a guest of the Australian Innovation Festival, invented the D-Pot, the "world’s first non-drip teapot", as part of her Masters degree at South Bank University in London.

  ENGINEERS MAKE STRONG, ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY PLASTIC FOAMS
Ohio State University engineers have found a way to make dense plastic foam that may replace solid plastic in the future. The engineers have also developed innovative manufacturing techniques to eliminate the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in foam production.

  NEW SUPERCONDUCTING TRANSFORMER IS LIGHT AND COMPACT
Researchers from the Technology Foundation STW and the University of Twente, in cooperation with Smit Transformatoren and Smit Draad, have developed a prototype coil for a superconducting transformer which is not only light and compact but also energy-efficient. A keen interest has already been expressed by several companies.

  POORER FARMERS BENEFIT MOST FROM ORGANIC PRACTICES
Farmers in developing countries are reaping the benefits of adopting green agricultural practices far more than their western counterparts, suggests a report published today, Thursday 14 February.

  FLYING HIGH
What do the hawkmoth, the fruit fly, and the bird-wrasse fish all have in common? Over millions of years, each of these animals seems to have figured out how to achieve high-lift in their respective medium. quickly, and with more stability and less heave, pitch, yaw, torque, drag and cavitation than man-made machines have yet been able to approach.

  INSECT BITES ON PLANTS REDUCE PHOTOSYNTHESIS, IMAGING DEVICE SHOWS
When insects feed on plants, they get nourishment and the plant gets damaged. The amount of damage has taken on new light, thanks to a new photosynthesis-measuring device that illuminates and photographs never-before-seen injury extending far beyond an insects bite.

  PHYSICS RESEARCH SUGGESTS IT MIGHT BE POSSIBLE TO LENGTHEN BATTERY LIFE
Experiments with carbon nanotubes, a new form of carbon discovered about a decade ago, suggest for the first time that it should be possible to store more energy in batteries using the tiny tubes than with conventional graphite electrodes.

  WATER QUALITY WAS ISSUE IN ANCIENT ROME, SAYS SCHOLAR. AQUEDUCTS WERE TECHNOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL MARVELS.
Can the great technological feats of the early Romans still inform urban planning today? Professor Christer Bruun of classics says they can in the area of water conservation.

  PUTTING ORANGE JUICE UNDER PRESSURE
Australian food scientists say subjecting orange juice to intense pressure can keep it fresh for three months.

  UMASS POLYMER SCIENTISTS CHALLENGE OLD THEORY; OFFER GREATER PRECISION IN CREATING NEW MATERIALS
A team of University of Massachusetts polymer scientists has challenged a longstanding theory regarding how plastics harden, perhaps offering scientists finer control over the flexibility or rigidity of specially produced plastics. The findings, by Professor Murugappan Muthukumar and former graduate student Paul Welch, were published recently in the journal Physical Review Letters. The work was funded by the National Science Foundation.

  BUMPY BEETLE COLLECTS ITS OWN WATER
A beetle may help humans solve the problem of finding drinking water in the desert. UK researchers have discovered that the tenebrionid beetle (Stenocara sp.), from the Namib Desert in southern Africa, has a tailor-made covering for collecting water from early-morning fog.

  STABLE POWER SUPPLY THANKS TO WIND TURBINES
Wind turbines can help keep the voltage in the electricity network at a constant level. The power electronics in the turbines can effectively correct peaks and dips in the mains voltage. This is the conclusion reached by NWO-funded researchers.

  A STEP FORWARD IN NANOTECHNOLOGY
Nanotechnology is in the news. Forecasters paint a vision of microscopic machines that can fight viruses or alter the functioning of bodily systems, of power generators smaller than a penny, of entire medical laboratories in an area smaller than a credit card. The problem is, there is a huge gap between the devices we can design and those we can implement, given current technology.

  RESEARCHERS IMPROVE THERMAL STABILITY OF FUEL CELL MATERIALS
Electrochemical energy is released when hydrogen combines with oxygen to produce water. Fuel cell technology can capture this energy to power cars, houses, and cell phones. Why aren’t we using fuel cells?

  SYNTHETIC ANTIFREEZE COULD PREVENT ICE GROWTH
A fish swimming in icy polar waters is helping scientists find ways to protect food from freezer burn, save fruit crops from frost, and use low temperature storage in complicated medical procedures like human organ transplants, researchers report.

  BOOST TO SOLAR COMMERCIALISATION
Rooftop solar panels that produce electricity at a cost approaching that of coal could be available in as little as four years, says an Australian company.

  INEEL’S SUPER-HARD STEEL ONE OF THIS YEAR’S TOP 100 TECHNOLOGICAL ACHIEVEMENTS
Super Hard Steel forms a tough, low cost, wear and corrosion resistant coating that outperforms traditional high-performance coatings. Developed at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, this coating offers a wealth of possibilities for new industrial applications.

  INTERNATIONAL AWARD FOR CONCRETE FROM WASTE
An Australian scientist has won the concrete world’s most prestigious award for his work in turning industrial waste into a useful component of concrete for building and construction.

  NEW SYSTEM DEVELOPED FOR REMOVING CONTAMINANTS FROM STORM RUN-OFF
During heavy rains, storm water runs across streets and highways, picking up oil, gasoline, soot and other contaminants and eventually depositing it in rivers, streams and bays. While a variety of methods have been used to remove the contaminants before they reach local waters, their effectiveness varies. Thomas Boving, assistant professor of geosciences at the University of Rhode Island, may have just solved the problem by using a cheap and readily available material: shredded aspen wood.

  ENGINEERS AND FARMERS UNITE TO MANUFACTURE EASY- DECOMPOSING PLASTIC PARTS FOR VEHICLES FROM AN AGRICULTURAL BIOCULTURE
Researchers from Worvick Univesity in collaboration with a group of farmers have started to grow a plant which is designed for manufacture of plastic parts for vehicles and which, having entered the ground, is decayed by microorganisms.

  IT IS FOOLISH TO DIE OF THIRST IN A DESERT IF IT`S FULL OF WATER
Any arid desert is actually full of water. And it is not a joke. The soil absorbs the atmosphere steam and even in ordinary and apparently dry sand there is water several tenths of a per cent by weight.


 

Copyright SciTecLibrary


To add the material   Terms of registration   Terms for placing technology, inventions, productions & other informations   Price list

You always can buy kamagra online now!
A few occasions when such websites were giving away Free Viagra Trial as real pills intended for door-to-door.