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Scientific News
Scientific News Sheetings and means of protection

  BIZARRE ATTRACTIVE FORCE FOUND IN MAYONNAISE
Scientists at Rice University have discovered that a little-understood tensile force, which was previously thought to be an oddity found only in the types of plastics used to make bulletproof vests, occurs in everyday emulsions like mayonnaise and salad dressing.

  UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO TECHNOLOGY COULD FOIL FRAUD WITH LASER-SENSITIVE DYES
Working with capsules of dye just a few billionths of a metre in diameter, researchers at University of Toronto and the advanced optical microscopy facility at Toronto’s Princess Margaret Hospital have created a new strategy for encrypting photographs, signatures and fingerprints on security documents.

  BROOKHAVEN LAB AND ARGONNE LAB SCIENTISTS. INVENT A PLASMA VALVE.
Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use. The new device, called a plasma valve, was developed through research funded by DOEs Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Science.

  HOW BLACK IS ’SUPER BLACK’?
Scientists at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Teddington, Middlesex, UK have good news for manufacturers and users across the optical instrumentation industry. Based on existing processes developed in the US and Japan, a team of researchers at NPL has developed a new technique for commercial manufacturing of ultra-black coatings, which represent one of the blackest, lowest reflectance surfaces developed so far.

  LEAF SECRET INSPIRES SELF-CLEANING PAINT
A self-cleaning paint inspired by lotus leaves is being developed by Australian researchers. A paint compound, which is currently being tested by its developers at the Centre for Advanced Materials Technology at the University of Sydney is designed to prevent dirt from sticking to its surface.

  FROM THE BONE OF A HORSE, A NEW IDEA FOR AIRCRAFT STRUCTURES
The horse, a classic model of grace and speed on land, is now an unlikely source of inspiration for more efficient flight.

  NEW LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MAY YIELD SAFER BUILDINGS, LONGER-LASTING TIRES
Researchers say they have developed the world’s strongest, lightest solids. Called aerogels, the sturdy materials are a high-tech amalgam of highly porous glass and plastic that is as light as air.

  NIST TEAM REPORTS METHOD TO CHARACTERIZE NEW INSULATING MATERIALS FOR MICROELECTRONICS
Researchers from the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reported today they have developed methods for characterizing key structural features of porous films being eyed as insulators for the ultrathin metal wires that will connect millions of devices on future microprocessors and increase processor speed. The advance, reported today at the American Chemical Society’s national meeting in Boston, will help semiconductor manufacturers and their materials suppliers home in on the most promising "nanoporous film" candidates for shielding miles of interconnecting wire on next-generation microprocessors.

  DISCOVERY COULD BRING WIDESPREAD USES FOR ’NANOCRYSTALS’
Researchers at Purdue University have made a surprising discovery that could open up numerous applications for metal "nanocrystals," or tiny crystals that are often harder, stronger and more wear resistant than the same materials in bulk form.

  HEAT SENSITIVE MATERIALS CHANGE COLOR WHEN HOT
Imagine a fire door that changes color when hot, football jerseys that can tell when a player is overheating, road signs that change color indicating icy road conditions, and food packaging stamps that disappear when products have been kept at room temperature for too long. At the University of Rhode Island, chemists Brett Lucht and Bill Euler and chemical engineer Otto Gregory are working to make these products a reality.

  NEW TECHNOLOGY CREATES ’SUPER SOAP’
Scientists have developed innovative soap technology that significantly reduces the attachment of bacteria to the skin. They report their findings today at the 102nd General Meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

  WHY STEEL ISN’T SO STAINLESS
Stainless steel isn’t always quite as rust-free as it could be - and now a team of British scientists have worked out why.

  BUILT IN BRAKES FOR SKIS AND SNOWBOARDS
Sheer terror. Blind panic. Whatever you call it, it’s that gut-wrenching feeling known to all newcomers to skiing and snowboarding as they hurtle helplessly downhill. But help is at hand for beginners to the pistes. A new generation of skis or snowboards will be fitted with built-in electronic brakes that slow them down before things get too scary.

  NU PROFESSOR WORKS TOWARD A PERMANENTLY GERM-FREE SURFACE: POLYMER GLASS COATING CAPABLE OF KILLING AIRBORNE BACTERIA ON CONTACT
Whose hands were on that doorknob before yours? That handrail, pay phone, or subway pole? Kim Lewis, newly appointed professor of biology at Northeastern University in Boston, has worked with scientists at M.I.T. and Tufts University to ease our germ-fearing minds about this very thing. In their research, they demonstrate that covalent attachment of N-alkylated poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) to glass surfaces can make surfaces permanently lethal to several types of bacteria on contact.

  FROM SILKWORM SILK, CORNELL RESEARCHERS PRODUCED HYBRID MATERIALS THAT ONE DAY COULD HEAL WOUNDS AND MAKE BULLETPROOF VESTS
Imagine a material that could expand by three to six times in size while remaining strong and stiff, and also could be biodegradable and biocompatible. Such a material would be invaluable as a wound-healing bandage or possibly a drug-delivery mechanism.

  INEEL’S SUPER-HARD STEEL ONE OF THIS YEAR’S TOP 100 TECHNOLOGICAL ACHIEVEMENTS
Super Hard Steel forms a tough, low cost, wear and corrosion resistant coating that outperforms traditional high-performance coatings. Developed at the Department of Energy’s Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, this coating offers a wealth of possibilities for new industrial applications.

  STRONTIUM TITANATE - A DEFORMABLE CERAMIC
Materials scientists at the Max-Planck-Institut fur Metallforschung, Stuttgart have achieved significant plastic deformation in strontium titanate (SrTiO3), an oxide ceramic material hitherto believed to be extremely fragile and brittle at room temperature. These results will change some of the concepts with which ceramic materials are treated as engineering materials today.

  RADIATION-RESISTANT CHIPS FOR STURDIER SATELLITES
Space is a tough environment for electronics. A burst of radiation from a solar flare can damage a satellite’s delicate circuits and knock years off its working life. Now research by a University of California, Davis, engineering student is pointing the way to more radiation-resistant microchips.


 

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