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Scientific News
Scientific News Monitoring systems and diagnostics

  FBI BALLISTICS EVIDENCE CONFUSES JURIES
Chemical analysis of lead in bullets cannot say for certain that a bullet came from a particular gun, according to an independent report into the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).

  BUSY BEES: COMPUTER VISION SYSTEM AUTOMATES ANALYSIS OF BEE ACTIVITY FOR INSIGHT INTO BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED ROBOT DESIGN
A new computer vision system for automated analysis of animal movement -- honey bee activities, in particular -- is expected to accelerate animal behavior research, which also has implications for biologically inspired design of robots and computers.

  BOTTLE BLONDES CANíT GET AWAY WITH MURDER
Hair at a crime scene may not be a clue to who committed murder, according to Australian forensics research.

  NEW SPRAYS CATCH ELUSIVE FINGERPRINTS
Forensics experts will no longer need to collect fingerprints from smooth surfaces, according to Australian research, which has tested new chemical sprays that allow prints to be lifted from surfaces as rough as bricks.

  CIA TO CAPTURE IRIS RECOGNITION AT A DISTANCE
The U.S. Central Intelligence Agency is developing technology that will be able to identify people from their iris - even while they are moving at a distance.

  RESEARCHERS CREATE POTENTIAL TOXIC SENSOR CHIP BY COMBINING ELECTRONICS WITH LIVING CELL
In experiments conducted at the University of California, Berkeley, researchers have found a way to tap into the telltale electrical signals that mark cell death, opening the door to the creation of a "canary on a chip" that can be used to sound the alarm of a biochemical attack or test drug toxicity on human tissue.

  ANCIENT DNA MAY BE MISLEADING SCIENTISTS
Ancient DNA in skeletons has a tendency to show damage in a particular region, resulting in misleading genetic data and mistaken conclusions about the origin of the skeleton, British scientists said.

  HOW MANY FISH IN THE SEA? CHECK THEIR GENES.
How do you manage fish stocks if you donít know how many fish are out there? Look at their genes, according to an Australian scientist developing a new tool to track populations.

  HEAT SENSITIVE MATERIALS CHANGE COLOR WHEN HOT
Imagine a fire door that changes color when hot, football jerseys that can tell when a player is overheating, road signs that change color indicating icy road conditions, and food packaging stamps that disappear when products have been kept at room temperature for too long. At the University of Rhode Island, chemists Brett Lucht and Bill Euler and chemical engineer Otto Gregory are working to make these products a reality.

  TIME FOR NEEDLE-FREE DIABETES MANAGEMENT
Diabetics are one step closer to blood-free glucose testing, with new developments to a wrist device that can ’suck’ fluid through the skin presented to a British conference this week. Professor Richard Guy and colleagues, from the University of Geneva in Switzerland, announced a new calibration method for the device, called ’GlucoWatch’.

  DIFFERENCES BETWEEN BOYS AND GIRLS SHOW LESS THAN THREE WEEKS INTO PREGNANCY
Female embryos exert a greater influence than male embryos over the hormone that nurtures early pregnancy, and the difference can be detected as little as 16 days after conception, according to new research published (Wednesday 30 January) in Europeís leading reproductive medicine journal Human Reproduction.

  INSECT BITES ON PLANTS REDUCE PHOTOSYNTHESIS, IMAGING DEVICE SHOWS
When insects feed on plants, they get nourishment and the plant gets damaged. The amount of damage has taken on new light, thanks to a new photosynthesis-measuring device that illuminates and photographs never-before-seen injury extending far beyond an insectís bite.

  ENGINEERS DEVELOP NEW CHEMICAL SENSOR BASED ON EXPERIMENTAL PHYSICS BREAKTHROUGH
For the first time, scientists have found evidence of a long-suspected phenomenon; tiny electrical currents produced when molecules interact with metal surfaces. The discovery may usher in a new generation of chemical detectors, and reveals details about catalytic processes used to produce more than half of the chemicals manufactured worldwide.

  SENSOR, MOLECULAR DEVICE DEVELOPMENT FOCUS OF NSF FUNDED RESEARCH
Two Virginia Tech research projects -- to develop new sensors for detecting pathogens and DNA, and to improve molecular devices in electronic applications -- received Nanoscale Exploratory Research (NER) grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

  STICKY FINGERPRINTS. EVEN A PRINT SMUDGED BEYOND RECOGNITION CAN NAIL A CRIMINAL.
THE sweaty, greasy residue that forms a fingerprint might one day reveal the identity of a criminal as surely as the pattern of whorls and ridges. Whenever we touch something, we leave behind a minute residue of proteins, salts and fatty acids. Because the exact proportions of these components vary between individuals, some forensic scientists suspect that a chemical fingerprint could be as unique as a physical one.


 

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