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Scientific News
Scientific News History

  HALLEY’S COMET PORTRAYED ON ANCIENT COIN
A rare ancient coin may feature an early record of Halley’s comet, researchers say.

  MAYAN CITY PLAYED POLITICS WITH NEIGHBOURS
Archaeologists are exploring a ruined kingdom in Guatemala to work out how it survived centuries of conflict in the ancient Mayan Indian world before being abandoned to the jungle more than 1200 years ago.

  MYSTERY ROMAN EMPEROR SHOWS HIS FACE
The discovery of a coin appears to confirm the brief rule of Domitianus, a mystery Roman emperor whose very existence had been doubted, according to a museum curator.

  DA VINCI INVENTED PLASTICS TOO
Leonardo da Vinci not only anticipated the aeroplane, the life jacket, the intercom and the robot, he created the first natural plastic, according to an Italian scholar.

  VANISHED INCA MAY HAVE USED BINARY CODE LANGUAGE
The vanished Inca civilisation of the Andes, long thought to have no writing, invented a seven-bit binary code to store information more than 500 years before the invention of the computer, argues an American anthropologist.

  CELTIC ARRIVED IN BRITAIN, FRANCE WITH FARMERS
A new method of analysing language supports the idea that farmers carried Celtic to the British Isles, Ireland and France in a single wave 6,000 years ago, researchers report.

  MUMMY OF ANCIENT EGYPT’S NEFERTITI FOUND?
The mummy of Queen Nefertiti, a co-ruler of Ancient Egypt and stepmother to the legendary boy king Tutankhamun, may have been found, archaeologists have announced.

  HEBREW UNIVERSITY EXCAVATIONS STRENGTHEN DATING OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL FINDINGS TO DAVID, SOLOMON.
A new, laboratory-based affirmation of the existence of a united Israelite monarchy headed by kings David and Solomon in the 10th century B.C.E. has been revealed as the result of excavations carried out by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem Institute of Archeology.

  NEANDERTHALS USED BOTH HANDS TO KILL
Neanderthals and early humans knew how to make spears but they didn’t know how to throw them. Instead, they had a limited hunting strategy, and used their spears merely to stab animals they had already trapped or ambushed. This finding by a team of anthropologists provides an important insight into a defining moment in our ancestors’ development, when early humans evolved from hunters who killed at close-quarters to sophisticated killers capable of bringing down large beasts from a distance.

  PENN MUSEUM ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNCOVER 3700 YEAR OLD ’MAGICAL’ BIRTH BRICK AT MAYOR’S RESIDENCE JUST OUTSIDE ABYDOS, EGYPT
July 2002-University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists have discovered a 3700-year-old "magical" birth brick inside the palatial residence of a Middle Kingdom mayor’s house just outside Abydos, in southern Egypt. The colorfully decorated mud birth brick-the first ever found-is one of a pair that would have been used to support a woman’s feet while squatting during actual childbirth.

  MUDDY MAYAN MYSTERY MADE CLEARER BY RESEARCHERS WORKING IN THE ’BAJOS’
A team of scholars led by University of Cincinnati professors Nicholas and Vernon Scarborough found evidence of a major environmental transformation that helps to explain a puzzle that has stumped Maya scholars for decades. Why would the Maya live in an area where the primary water source is little more than mud half of the year?

  THE ROMANS PREFERRED SMALL-SCALE SOLUTIONS TO AQUEDUCTS AND SEWERS
Contrary to common opinion, the Romans had several systems for the supply and drainage of water. The Romans preferred small-scale provisions such as cesspits, wells and rainwater tanks. The residents only constructed a water supply network or a sewerage system if these were not effective.

  REWRITING THE ‘BIBLE OF EGYPTOLOGY’
An Australian Egyptologist has been studying the tombs of the vast Giza cemetery and is re-writing the history of ancient Egypt. Professor Naguib Kanawati of the Australian Centre for Egyptology at Macquarie University has been recording and interpreting the scenes and hieroglyphs which chronicle the lives of government officials, priests and bureaucrats as far back as the 4th Dynasty, the age that saw the construction of the Great Pyramids.

  MUMMY-MAKERS USED ELABORATE RECIPES
The process of embalming in Ancient Egypt was more sophisticated than previously thought, new analysis shows. Richard Evershead and Stephen Buckley of the University of Bristol completed a chemical analysis of 13 mummies. They found that embalmers used a wider variety of ingredients, and changed their techniques more frequently, than other research has shown.


 

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